Cultural Differences In Television Advertising-3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VALUES AND APPEALS 1)

a. Kotler (1997)

He differentiates three different types of appeals:

1. rational appeals,

He classifies rational appeals as “appealing to the audience’s self interest”. Typically they refer to the quality, value or performance of the product.

2. emotional appeals

Emotional appeals “attempt to stir up negative or positive emotions” (ibid.), and include fear, guilt, joy. Although Kotler makes a reference to negative emotions, I would argue, that these are turned into positive appeals in commercials. For example the negative “fear” appeal is used only when the product can actually provide safety.

3. moral appeals.

Finally moral appeals “are directed to the audience’s sense of what is right and proper.”(ibid.) These may include such appeals as ecological appeals and nationalism.

The often interchanging use of appeals and values by some researchers can be explained when looking at the interaction that is necessary between the two:

· Appeals are used to appeal to the values a consumer holds;

· Values are the underlying source of appeals.

b. Wells, Burnett and Moriarty (1995)

They define values and tentatively describe the interaction as: The source for norms [defined as simple rules for behaviour] is our values.

An example of a value is personal security. Possible norms expressing this value range from the bars on the window and double-locked doors in Brooklyn, New York, to unlocked cars and homes in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. Values are few in number and are not tied to specific objects or situations. (…) Advertisers often refer to core values when selecting their primary appeals. Burnett and Moriarty (1995): 167.

This extract clarifies this interaction to some extent: Knowing that people value personal safety, and that a product X can enhance the personal safety, advertising for product X may use a safety appeal. So strictly argued, the safety value (or the desire to be safe) is held by the consumer – and the appeal is what is expressed in the advertisement in order to suggest to the consumer that their desired state of personal safety can be enhanced.

The appeal hence represents the underlying value.

c. Hofstede (1994):

This definition of values comes relatively close to the definition of values given by Hofstede (1994): Values are broad tendencies to prefer certain states of affairs over others.

To continue the above example: The advertising for product X, appealing for enhanced personal safety, displays a preference for a state of safety. And as such can be interpreted as displaying the preference for the state of enhanced personal safety (or in other words: the value of personal safety). Hence, if an advertisement displays a happy family, it can be understood to use the family appeal to represent family values.

In order to avoid any further confusion of the situation, for the remainder of this document:

We will refer to “appeals” as the values that are expressed in advertising, by using appeals, or the appeals that are displayed in advertising representing certain values. We will use values strictly when this represents a tendency to prefer certain states of affairs over others by human beings in the real world.

d. Pollay (1986)

The use of appeals, and with them the possibility of a distorted representation of reality, has been a topic of discussion for a considerable time. In 1983 Pollay published a coding framework for the identification of cultural appeals (actually, he called them values) in advertising, primarily as a response to the discussion over the cultural consequences of advertising appeals and what values of society these reflect.

By reviewing a variety of advertising related literature, as well as literature and values research in other disciplines, such as psychology, sociology and the humanities, Pollay created a list of 42 appeals most commonly found in advertising. He notes, that advertising does reflect a somewhat different set of values as can be found in a society in general (Pollay, 1986), a notion which he termed the “distorted mirror”, and which has lead to a significant debate over the subject matter. Clearly, advertising will attempt to have positive appeals associated with the product, and hence lead to a distorted reflection of reality. Although Kotler (1997) includes negative appeals, such as fear or guilt, in his examples, these will normally be turned “positive” in advertising, and are included as such in the Pollay list: For example the fear of an accident is resolved by demonstrating the safety features of a car (safety appeal).

Other researchers who carried out research into advertising appeals have developed different lists of possible values, often because they only tested for certain appeals rather than a complete set of appeals. For example Mueller (1996) and Cheng & Schweitzer (1996) used limited lists developed by them to reflect their line of enquiry. However, both take their definitions from Pollay’s original work.

As such, Pollay’s framework is the most complete set of possible appeals with definitions. It is also “pre-tested” as it is derived from previously published material, and is generally considered to be complete. As such may be the most suitable instrument both for probing a complete set of appeals, if used as a whole, or a limited set of appeals, if used in parts.

Clearly, in order to be effective, advertising has to appeal to the positive values that are held in the target group, or taken at large, the target society. If advertising is “out of touch” with the target group, it may alienate the target group, as the consumer can no longer identify with the product.

It is hence essential for the advertising to reflect at least a proportion of the values held by the target group, or society at large.

As Hofstede and others have demonstrated, values can vary considerably between cultures.

Some cultures may be comfortable with a relatively high level of uncertainty – if expressed in appeals, then it can be expected that advertising in these cultures will make less use of safety appeals than advertising from a culture where the culture is less comfortable with uncertainty.

Equally, in a society that holds highly individualistic values, it can be expected that advertising in general will use more appeals to individual achievement than in a society that holds dominantly collectivist values.

As such, advertising appeals are not a mere representation of a culture’s values at large, but they represent a selective sample of positive and desired values of that culture. They are in fact a “distorted mirror”, a mirror that represents idealistic, rather than realistic, values.

1) http://www.stephweb.com/capstone/t8.shtml

Prof. C.J.M. Beniers

NL Zoetermeer

22-11-2011

About Professor C.J.M. Beniers

Prof. C.J.M. Beniers is a well known authority in the field of modern and international communication techniques. He developed the Six-Component-Model. This model enables companies, institutions and politicians to communicate and negotiate with counterparts from all over the world successfully. His career began as international manager at Philips and later he earned his doctorate as professor in communication. He has more than 35 years experience as manager and management trainer. Thus he knows both sides – theory and praxis – very well. As scientist, Prof. Beniers conducts frequently research in the field of intercultural communication. The results of his interesting research can be found in news articles, free pod casts, audio books and his E-books such as “Bridging The Cultural Gap.” Here, modern managers learn how to prepare for business meetings with people from different cultures; they acquire the techniques and tools to handle situations in times of crises successfully, master intercultural barriers, country-specific communication patterns, looking into personal cultural values & systems. Knowing all this, men can prevent cultural misunderstandings and misinterpretations – not only in business but also in private life.

Contact:

Prof. C.J.M. Beniers
Amaliaplaats 2
2713 BJ Zoetermeer
The Netherlands

Telefone: +31 (0) 79 – 3 19  03 81
Mobile:  +31 (0) 6 2 061 8494

Email: info@beniers-consultancy.com

Website: www.beniers-consultancy.com

 

 

No TweetBacks yet. (Be the first to Tweet this post

Cultural Differences In Television Advertising-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cultural differences in television advertising (1)

1. Introduction

Is it possible to persuade consumers in different markets with the same advertising message? Will they respond favourably? Or should the advertising message be customised to reflect local culture? This question is one of the most fundamental decisions when planning an advertising campaign in different cultural areas, and, not surprisingly, one of the most frequently discussed issues in advertising today. Whereas many anecdotes tell the story of failed, or misunderstood, advertising, little clarity exists what exactly makes advertising different from country to country, and what types of appeals are used to promote different products in different markets – if there should be any difference whatsoever.

One side in this debate emphasises that the world is growing ever closer, and that the world can be treated as one large market, with only superficial differences in values (Levitt, 1983). In their view, advertising and marketing can be standardised across cultures, and the same values can be used to persuade customers to buy or consume the product. The opposing side is content with the fact that the basic needs may well be the same around the world, however they argue that the way in which these needs are met and satisfied differs from culture to culture. Any marketing (and advertising) campaign should, in their view, reflect the local habits, lifestyles and economical conditions in order to be effective. In 1985, Woods et al. concluded in a study of consumer purpose in purchase in the US, Quebec and Korea, that “important differences are found in the reasons why they [the consumers] purchase products familiar to all three countries”.

Many researchers have contributed to the debate, examining a sample of advertising for particular ways of portraying lifestyle and themes used (Gilly, 1990; Tansey, Hyman & Zinkhan, 1990); advertising strategies and information content (Lin, 1993; Zandpour, Chang & Catalano 1992; Ramaprasad & Hasegawa, 1992), the use of humour (Weinberger & Spotts, 1989; Alden, Hower & Lee, 1992), Americanisation of appeals used (Wiles, Wiles & Tjernlund, 1996; Mueller 1992) or they tested for a mix of different themes, styles, appeals or advertising content. These studies, among others, and the magnitude of their findings have put significant doubt over the theories and applicability of standardised, global advertising. They clearly suggest to localise advertising messages to suit consumer expectation in each market (Albers-Miller, 1996b).

However, the degree of difference in advertising strategies and appeals used may well be very different not only from country to country, but also from product category to product category. As Zandpour, Chang and Catalano (1992) and Katz and Lee (1992) have pointed out, information content, creative strategy, format and content style differ with each product category.

2. Conceptual Background & Definitions

Ad creation, pre market testing and localisation

Advertising creation can vary enormously from one company promoting their products or services across borders to another company. Whereas real economic benefits, dominantly economies of scale, can be obtained by standardising advertising across borders, many companies choose not to do so, but rather to rely on local knowledge.

In order to create a commercial, an advertising agency is usually instructed to create the overall concept in line with the marketing objectives, create a set of different test commercials and pre-test the commercials for effectiveness. This is a crucial step for advertising creation, and often takes a relatively long time, in which the test commercials are tested qualitatively and quantitatively in focus groups, through questionnaires, in test markets, sample areas and so on. After successful testing, the real commercial is created, and finally airtime for the commercial is booked or auctioned (either directly or through a media agency). During and after the commercial is running, further tests are usually carried out in order to optimise advertising targets with real out comes, and commercials may be adjusted depending on the outcome.

In a survey of the Fortune 500 US-based multinational companies, Hite and Fraser (1988) reported, that – - 50% of these companies used a foreign (i.e. local to the market) agency for their advertising; – 21% used an international agency or network (i.e. an angency that maintained local offices in the target market); – 18% used a foreign affiliates of an in-house-agency.

In the same report, Hite and Fraser also observe a steep decline in the trend to use the same advertising (standardised advertising) in different markets. Earlier reports (Sorenson and Wiechmann, 1975; Boddewya, Soehl and Picard, 1986) reported that in 1975 only 20% of multinational companies utilised localised versions of their advertising, in 1986 the figure reported had grown to 39%. In their own survey, Hite and Fraser (1988) reported, that

- 36% of companies that advertise across borders use localised advertising, and that

- a further 56% use a combination strategy (such as the same images, different text).

- Only 8% used standardised advertising across borders.

They also reported, that

- 95% of the respondents agreed or strongly agreed to change the language of their advertising depending on the target market,

- 59% the product attributes, 69% the models, 58% the scenic background and

- 31% the colours used. When carefully observed, this trend holds true for a large amount of European advertising.

- A number of companies use completely different commercials in the UK, the Netherlands and/or Germany, such as the German brands Müller and Holsten Pils.

- In Germany Müller’s commercials focus on the health benefits, whereas in the UK the commercials emphasise the taste of the yoghurt. Holsten’s German advertising features friendship and achievement set on a sailing boat at sea,

- whereas the UK advertising is a Monty Python style sketch set in a bar.

- Other commercials use the same images, but change the text completely: such as Max factor’s commercials featuring Madonna.

- In the UK, Madonna talks about how superficial life as a superstar is, and the lipstick is a mean used to seduce an attractive co-actor.

- In Germany, Madonna talks about how important it is to look good even in a kissing scene, and there is little evidence of intended seduction of the co-actor at all.

1) http://www.stephweb.com/capstone/t8.shtml

Prof. C.J.M. Beniers

NL Zoetermeer

08-10-2012

About Professor C.J.M. Beniers

Prof. C.J.M. Beniers is a well known authority in the field of modern and international communication techniques. He developed the Six-Component-Model. This model enables companies, institutions and politicians to communicate and negotiate with counterparts from all over the world successfully. His career began as international manager at Philips and later he earned his doctorate as professor in communication. He has more than 35 years experience as manager and management trainer. Thus he knows both sides – theory and praxis – very well. As scientist, Prof. Beniers conducts frequently research in the field of intercultural communication. The results of his interesting research can be found in news articles, free pod casts, audio books and his E-books such as “Bridging The Cultural Gap.” Here, modern managers learn how to prepare for business meetings with people from different cultures; they acquire the techniques and tools to handle situations in times of crises successfully, master intercultural barriers, country-specific communication patterns, looking into personal cultural values & systems. Knowing all this, men can prevent cultural misunderstandings and misinterpretations – not only in business but also in private life.

Contact:


Prof. C.J.M. Beniers

Amaliaplaats 2

2713 BJ Zoetermeer
The Netherlands

Telefone: +31 (0) 79 – 3 19  03 81

Mobile:  +31 (0) 6 36180834

Email: info@beniers-consultancy.com

Website: www.beniers-consultancy.com

 

 

 

 

Dimensionen nationaler Kulturen-7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Neutrale Kulturen – Definition/Umschreibung:

Selbstbeherrschung und kühl-sachliches Auftreten werden favorisiert. Es wird wenig gelacht, Körperkontakt wird vermieden. In Nordamerika und Nordwesteuropa sind die Beziehungen zu Kollegen und Geschäftspartnern sachlich und zielorientiert. Der gesunde Menschenverstand hält Emotionen unter Kontrolle, denn man denkt, dass Emotionen trübend wirken.

 Affektive Kulturen – Definition/Umschreibung:

Gestikulieren und Körperkontakt sind üblich. In Afrika und Lateinamerika sind Emotionen Teil der Beziehungen zu Kollegen und Geschäftspartnern: loslachen, sich ärgern, sich streiten usw. 

(1) Riding The Waves of Culture: Understanding Diversity in Global Business with Charles Hampden-Turner (1997)

C.J.M. Beniers

NL Zoetermeer

04-10-2012

Über C.J.M. Beniers

C.J.M. Beniers ist ein bekannter Fachmann auf dem Gebiet von modernen und internationalen Kommunikationstechniken und Entwickler vom Sechs-Komponenten-Modell. Damit können Firmen, Institutionen und Politiker mit Gesprächspartnern aus aller Welt erfolgreich kommunizieren und verhandeln. Seine Karriere begann als internationaler Manager bei Philips N.V.  und hat mittlerweile mehr als 35 Jahre Erfahrung als Manager und Management Trainer. Dadurch kennt er beide Seiten, die Theorie und die Praxis sehr genau. Als Kommunikationsexperte veranstaltet er wissenschaftliche Forschungen im interkulturellen Bereich. Die interessanten Ergebnisse der Forschungen sind in seinen E-Büchern nachzulesen, wie z.B. “Bridging The Cultural Gap”. Hier lernen moderne Manager sich erfolgreich auf Geschäfte mit Leuten aus Fremdkulturen vorzubereiten. Unter anderem werden aktuelle Themen wie Verhandlungen in Krisenzeiten, interkulturelle Barrieren, landespezifische Kommunikationstechniken, persönliche kulturbedingte Wertesysteme und Missverständnisse behandelt und plausibel erklärt.

Kontakt:
C.J.M. Beniers

Amaliaplaats 2

2713 BJ Zoetermeer
Niederlande

Telefon: +31 (o) 79 – 3 19 03 81
Mobile: +31 (0) 636180834

Email: beniers@beniers-consultancy.com
Website: www.beniers-consultancy.com

Dimensionen nationaler Kulturen-6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dimensionen nationaler Kulturen nach Trompenaars-2 (1)

Spezifische Kulturen – Definition/Umschreibung:

Spezifisch: Man ist im Umgang mit den Mitmenschen (z. B. Geschäftspartnern) geradlinig und zielgerichtet. Man kommt direkt auf den Punkt, ist offen zielgerichtet in der Beziehung. Man ist präzise, offen, definitiv, transparent. Prinzipien sind unabhängig vom jeweiligen Partner.

 Diffuse Kulturen – Definition/Umschreibung:

Diffus: Auch in Situationen mit einem festen Ziel (z. B. Verkauf) geht man nicht geradlinig auf das Ziel zu, sondern baut allerlei sonstige menschliche Beziehungen auf („Basarmentalität“). Man ist indirekt, anscheinend ziellos in der Beziehung. Man ist ausweichend, taktvoll, zweideutig, undurchsichtig. Man betreibt Situations-„Ethik“ (Vetternwirtschaft), abhängig von Partner und Umständen.

(1) Riding The Waves of Culture: Understanding Diversity in Global Business with Charles Hampden-Turner (1997)

C.J.M. Beniers

NL Zoetermeer

14-09-2012

Über C.J.M. Beniers

C.J.M. Beniers ist ein bekannter Fachmann auf dem Gebiet von modernen und internationalen Kommunikationstechniken und Entwickler vom Sechs-Komponenten-Modell. Damit können Firmen, Institutionen und Politiker mit Gesprächspartnern aus aller Welt erfolgreich kommunizieren und verhandeln. Seine Karriere begann als internationaler Manager bei Philips N.V.  und hat mittlerweile mehr als 35 Jahre Erfahrung als Manager und Management Trainer. Dadurch kennt er beide Seiten, die Theorie und die Praxis sehr genau. Als Kommunikationsexperte veranstaltet er wissenschaftliche Forschungen im interkulturellen Bereich. Die interessanten Ergebnisse der Forschungen sind in seinen E-Büchern nachzulesen, wie z.B. “Bridging The Cultural Gap”. Hier lernen moderne Manager sich erfolgreich auf Geschäfte mit Leuten aus Fremdkulturen vorzubereiten. Unter anderem werden aktuelle Themen wie Verhandlungen in Krisenzeiten, interkulturelle Barrieren, landespezifische Kommunikationstechniken, persönliche kulturbedingte Wertesysteme und Missverständnisse behandelt und plausibel erklärt.

Kontakt:
C.J.M. Beniers

Amaliaplaats 2

2713 BJ Zoetermeer
Niederlande

Telefon: +31 (o) 79 – 3 19 03 81
Mobile: +31 (0) 636180834

Email: beniers@beniers-consultancy.com
Website: www.beniers-consultancy.com

 

Dimensionen nationaler Kulturen-5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dimensionen nationaler Kulturen nach Trompenaars-1 (1)

Universalismus – Definition/Umschreibung:

Der Glaube an allgemeine menschliche Werte, die für jeden gelten (gelten sollten), Werte, die nichts mit der Kultur von Menschen zu tun haben. Diese allgemeinen Werte sind wichtiger als persönliche Beziehungen. Im Universalismus wird nach den universellen Gesetzen gesucht, um das einzig Wahre zu erkennen. Dabei identifiziert man die USA als eine besonders universalistisch ausgeprägte Kultur – Frankreich hingegen als eine eher partikularistisch ausgeprägte Kultur. Dabei ist diese Dimension bis zu einem gewissen Grad mit der Individualismus/Kollektivismus-Dimension verbunden – jedoch mit einigen Ausnahmen. Als grobe Richtlinie kann jedoch gelten, dass individualistische Kulturen eher zum Universalismus neigen. Der Universalismus führte zu der universellen Erklärung der Menschenrechte.

 Partikularismus – Definition/Umschreibung:

Die grundlegende Idee des Partikularismus ist, dass es nicht nur eine richtige Version gibt. Partikularisten neigen dazu, regionalen, politischen oder kulturellen Interessen großen Wert beizumessen. Entscheidungen trifft man situationsabhängig. Daher auch keine universellen menschlichen Werte, sondern Werte, die für jede Gruppe, Nation anders sein können. Partikularistische Kulturen halten situationsbedingte Verhältnisse für wichtiger als Allgemeinregeln.

(1) Riding The Waves of Culture: Understanding Diversity in Global Business with Charles Hampden-Turner (1997)

C.J.M. Beniers

NL Zoetermeer

26-08-2012

Über C.J.M. Beniers

C.J.M. Beniers ist ein bekannter Fachmann auf dem Gebiet von modernen und internationalen Kommunikationstechniken und Entwickler vom Sechs-Komponenten-Modell. Damit können Firmen, Institutionen und Politiker mit Gesprächspartnern aus aller Welt erfolgreich kommunizieren und verhandeln. Seine Karriere begann als internationaler Manager bei Philips N.V.  und hat mittlerweile mehr als 35 Jahre Erfahrung als Manager und Management Trainer. Dadurch kennt er beide Seiten, die Theorie und die Praxis sehr genau. Als Kommunikationsexperte veranstaltet er wissenschaftliche Forschungen im interkulturellen Bereich. Die interessanten Ergebnisse der Forschungen sind in seinen E-Büchern nachzulesen, wie z.B. “Bridging The Cultural Gap”. Hier lernen moderne Manager sich erfolgreich auf Geschäfte mit Leuten aus Fremdkulturen vorzubereiten. Unter anderem werden aktuelle Themen wie Verhandlungen in Krisenzeiten, interkulturelle Barrieren, landespezifische Kommunikationstechniken, persönliche kulturbedingte Wertesysteme und Missverständnisse behandelt und plausibel erklärt.

Kontakt:
C.J.M. Beniers

Amaliaplaats 2

2713 BJ Zoetermeer
Niederlande

Telefon: +31 (o) 79 – 3 19 03 81
Mobile: +31 (0) 636180834

Email: beniers@beniers-consultancy.com
Website: www.beniers-consultancy.com

 

 

 

Warum ist interkulturelle Kompetenz notwendig?

May 29, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Kommunikation, Management, Psychologie 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Warum ist interkulturelle Kompetenz notwendig?(1)

„Die spinnen, die Römer!“ Eine Aussage, die Obelix (in dem Comic „Asterix und Obelix“) bei Kontakt mit den Römern oft und gerne wiederholt. In diesem Comic erfreuen wir uns an Stereotypen, an egozentrischen Sichtweisen, an der Unfähigkeit, sich in den anderen Hineinzuversetzen. Versteht Obelix eine Handlungsweise der Römer nicht, fragt er nicht nach den römischen Gebräuchen oder Sitten, sondern er definiert dieses Verhalten aus seiner sicheren Gewissheit im Mittelpunkt der Welt zu stehen und aus seiner ureigenen gallischen Perspektive.

In unserem Geschäftsleben wäre so eine Einstellung fatal. Die Kommunikation zwischen Menschen, die dem gleichen Kulturkreis angehören, ist ja schon nicht immer einfach, aber ungleich schwieriger ist die Kommunikation zwischen unterschiedlichen Kulturen. Hier sind nicht nur die individuellen, sondern auch die kulturspezifischen Eigenheiten des Gegenübers zu beachten. Ob es sich beispielsweise um Begrüßungsrituale, Gesprächspausen, Körperdistanz oder die Bedeutung des Lachens handelt, alles was wir sagen, tun oder denken ist kulturell geprägt. Soll die interkulturelle Kommunikation erfolgreich sein, dann ist also eine besondere interkulturelle Sensibilität, eine besondere interkulturelle Kompetenz notwendig.

Wir leben in einer Zeit zunehmender Globalisierung. Internationale Kontakte sind an der Tagesordnung. Kaum eine Firma, die nicht exportiert oder importiert, viele Firmen haben global verteilt Tochterunternehmen, Joint-Ventures oder sonstige Kooperationen.

Dadurch werden die Anforderungen an deutsche Führungskräfte (Expatriates) komplizierter. Es kommt nicht nur auf fachliche Kompetenz, sondern vor allem auf soziale Kompetenz an. Wollen sie erfolgreich sein, müssen sich Führungskräfte schnell an neue und unterschiedliche Situationen anpassen können, auch in Bezug auf Situationen, die im Vergleich zur eigenen Kultur verschieden sind. Die Anforderungen einer interkulturellen Situation sind allerdings mit dieser situativen Anpassungsfähigkeit nicht zu bewältigen, zu komplex, zu verschieden sind Denken oder Handeln.

Ein „diversity management“, also ein Management der Mannigfaltigkeit, wird eine immer wichtigere Rolle in Unternehmen spielen. Durch die Ergrauung der deutschen Bevölkerung werden immer mehr ausländische Mitarbeiter Stellen in deutschen Unternehmen einnehmen. Kulturell homogene Teams innerhalb einer Firma wird es immer seltener geben. Hinzu kommt, dass die Projekt- oder Teamarbeit längst nicht mehr auf einen Standort oder eine Region beschränkt ist. Projekte, bei denen beispielsweise der Programmierer in Indien, der Entwickler in Frankreich, der Produzent in China sitzen und die Federführung in Deutschland liegt, sind schon längst nicht mehr die Ausnahme. Die Zukunft gehört interkulturellen Teams, die von allen Beteiligten interkulturelle Kompetenz fordern. Führungskräfte, Vorgesetzte und Kollegen müssen Fähigkeiten zur Bewältigung interkultureller Überschneidungssituationen aufweisen.

Wer die interkulturellen Herausforderungen nicht lösen kann, wird über kurz oder lang das Nachsehen haben. Etwa die Hälfte aller interkulturellen Verhandlungen scheitern aufgrund der mangelnden interkulturellen Kompetenz der Beteiligten. Projekt- oder Teamarbeit ist ohne interkulturelle Kompetenz ungleich schwieriger, viel Zeit und damit auch viel Geld gehen unnötigerweise verloren. Wer im Wettbewerb bestehen will – ob als Unternehmen oder als Person – der muss diese interkulturelle Herausforderung erfolgreich bewältigen können.

 Tipp

Notwendigkeit interkultureller Kompetenz

  • Zunehmende Globalisierung
  • Erweiterung der EU
  • Zunahme ausländischer Mitarbeiter
  • Höhere Frequenz interkultureller Überschneidungssituationen

Interkulturelle Kompetenz bzw. erfolgreiche interkulturelle Kommunikation setzt Wissen voraus: Was heißt Kultur? Welche Dimensionen der Kultur gibt es? Was ist interkulturelle Kompetenz und welche Hindernisse sind zu überwinden? Was heißt interkulturelle Kommunikation? Was ist dabei zu beachten? Und schließlich: wie lassen sich interkulturelle Verhandlungen meistern? Das sind die zentralen Fragen, die es im Kontakt mit anderen Kulturen zu beantworten gilt.

(1) C.J.M. Beniers. Managerwissen Kompakt. Interkulturelle Kommunikation. Hanser Verlag München/Wien 2006. ISBN: 3-446-40220-9.

C.J.M. Beniers

NL Zoetermeer

© Copyright 2012

29-05-2012

Über C.J.M. Beniers

C.J.M. Beniers ist ein bekannter Fachmann auf dem Gebiet von modernen und internationalen Kommunikationstechniken und Entwickler vom Sechs-Komponenten-Modell. Damit können Firmen, Institutionen und Politiker mit Gesprächspartnern aus aller Welt erfolgreich kommunizieren und verhandeln. Seine Karriere begann als internationaler Manager bei Philips N.V.  und hat mittlerweile mehr als 35 Jahre Erfahrung als Manager und Management Trainer. Dadurch kennt er beide Seiten, die Theorie und die Praxis sehr genau. Als Kommunikationsexperte veranstaltet er wissenschaftliche Forschungen im interkulturellen Bereich. Die interessanten Ergebnisse der Forschungen sind in seinen E-Büchern nachzulesen, wie z.B. “Bridging The Cultural Gap”. Hier lernen moderne Manager sich erfolgreich auf Geschäfte mit Leuten aus Fremdkulturen vorzubereiten. Unter anderem werden aktuelle Themen wie Verhandlungen in Krisenzeiten, interkulturelle Barrieren, landespezifische Kommunikationstechniken, persönliche kulturbedingte Wertesysteme und Missverständnisse behandelt und plausibel erklärt.

Kontakt:
C.J.M. Beniers

Amaliaplaats 2

2713 BJ Zoetermeer

Niederlande

Telefon: +31 (o) 79 – 3 19 03 81
Mobile: +31 (0) 6 36180834

Email: beniers@beniers-consultancy.com
Website: www.beniers-consultancy.com

Interkulturelle Kompetenz

April 12, 2009 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Kommunikation, Management, Psychologie 

slide0122

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interkulturelle Kompetenz

 

Was versteht man unter interkultureller Kompetenz?

Es gibt zahllose Definitionen und Umschreibungen.

Erstens:

Die Summe aller Fähigkeiten, die notwendig sind, um mit Angehörigen anderer Kulturkreise einen Zustand der Gemeinsamkeit herzustellen, der nicht von bestimmten kulturspezifischen Eigenheiten und Vorstellungen dominiert wird.

Zweitens
Interkulturelle Kompetenz ist die Voraussetzung für eine erfolgreiche und für alle Beteiligten zufrieden stellende Kommunikation, Begegnung und Kooperation zwischen Menschen aus Fremdkulturen.

 

Welche sind die Komponenten interkultureller Kompetenz?

1. Wissen

Wissen  ist  essentielle  Vorbedingung  für  das  eigene  “richtige”  Verhalten  in  bezug  auf  die  Achtung  von  Kommunikationsnormen  und  die  Bewältigung  von  Konfliktsituationen.

Wissen  ist  Dreh-  und  Angelpunkt  für  das  Gelingen  interkultureller  Kompetenz

2. Erfahrung

Erfahrungen  nehmen eine  Interimstellung  zwischen  Persönlichkeit  und  Wissen  ein,  indem  sie  die  Persönlichkeit  prägen  und  zur  Wissensaufnahme  beitragen.

3. Person

Eine interkulturell kompetente Person soll unter anderem folgende wichtige Fähigkeiten aufweisen:

- Kontaktstärke

- Einfühlungsvermögen

- Humor:

4. Sachkompetenz

Diese Fähigkeit bildet die Grundlage interkultureller Kompetenz und beinhaltet folgendes:

Erstens das  Wissen  eigener  kultureller  Werte  und  Einstellungen;

Zweitens das  Wissen  fremder  kultureller  Werte  und  Einstellungen;

Drittens das  Wissen  um  die  mögliche  Rivalität  von  Werten  wie  etwa  Gerechtigkeit  oder  Solidarität.

5. Sozialkompetenz

Sozialkompetenz ist besonders in Interaktionssequenzen gefragt. Sozialkompetenz umfasst:

Erstens: die  Fähigkeit,  mit  Streß  umzugehen.

Zweitens: die  Fähigkeit,  Widersprüche  und  Konflikte  in  Interaktion  und  Kommunikation  kulturadäquat  auszutragen.

Drittens: die  Fähigkeit,  Empathie  für  das  fremdkulturelle  Individuum  zu  entwickeln.

6. Selbstkompetenz

Selbstkompetenz ist die  Erkenntnis,  wie  das “ich”  selbst  von  kulturellen  Werten  und  Einstellungen  beeinflußt  wird und  die  Erkenntnis,  welche  Muster  seiner  Kultur  oder  welche  Subkulturen  seiner  Kultur  sein  Selbstverständnis  ausmachen.

7. Wahrnehmungssensitivität

Darunter versteht man die Fähigkeit, in Situationen möglichst viele wichtige Wirkfaktoren zu identifizieren und eine große Sensibilität für psychologische Einflußgrößen und Wirkungen an den Tag zu legen.

Hierzu benötigt man die Fähigkeit zur Perspektivübernahme, Offenheit und die Diversität von Wahrnehmungsebenen, das heißt ein breites Wahrnehmungsvermögen.

8. Orientierungswissen

Hierzu rechnet man die Fähigkeit zur Orientierung in unklaren und problematischen Situationen, die Diversität von Erklärungsebenen. Mit anderen Worten: Vielfalt von Erklärungsansätzen und die Struktur der Erklärungen, das heißt die Größe des Bezugs der Erklärung zu einer konkreten Situation.

9. Lernmotivation und Lernfähigkeit

Lernmotivation heißt in diesem Zusammenhang die Fähigkeit einer Person, zu erkennen, wie wichtig interkulturelles Lernen ist und die Fähigkeit, anschließend angemessene Lernressourcen zu erschließen.

10. Handlungswissen

Eine interkulturell kompetente Person verfügt nicht nur über ein Verständnis des fremdkulturellen Orientierungssystems, das heißt Verständnis über die jeweiligen Kulturstandards, und dessen Auswirkungen auf das Verhalten eines zu einer Fremdkultur gehörigen  Interaktionspartners, sondern auch über die Fähigkeit dieses Wissen in konkrete Handlungen umzusetzen.

Zusammenfassung

Interkulturelle Kompetenz zeigt sich in der Fähigkeit, in adäquater Weise unterschiedliche Kulturstandards, das heißt Werte, Normen, Regeln und Einstellungen von Menschen aus Fremdkulturen zu berücksichtigen und dadurch synergieträchtige Formen der Zusammenarbeit zu realisieren zur Gestaltung von Gemeinsamem.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C.J.M. Beniers

NL Zoetermeer, 12-04-2009

Über C.J.M. Beniers

C.J.M. Beniers ist ein bekannter Fachmann auf dem Gebiet von modernen und internationalen Kommunikationstechniken und Entwickler vom Sechs-Komponenten-Modell. Damit können Firmen, Institutionen und Politiker mit Gesprächspartnern aus aller Welt erfolgreich kommunizieren und verhandeln. Seine Karriere begann als internationaler Manager bei Philips N.V. und hat mittlerweile mehr als 35 Jahre Erfahrung als Manager und Management Trainer. Dadurch kennt er beide Seiten, die Theorie und die Praxis, sehr genau. Als Kommunikationsexperte veranstaltet er wissenschaftliche Forschungen im interkulturellen Bereich. Die interessanten Ergebnisse  dieser Forschungen sind in seinen E-Büchern nachzulesen, wie z.B. “Bridging The Cultural Gap”. Hier lernen moderne Manager sich erfolgreich auf Geschäfte mit Leuten aus Fremdkulturen vorzubereiten. Unter anderem werden aktuelle Themen wie Verhandlungen in Krisenzeiten, interkulturelle Barrieren, landesspezifische Kommunikationstechniken, persönliche kulturbedingte Wertesysteme und Missverständnisse behandelt und plausibel erklärt.

Kontakt:
C.J.M. Beniers

Amaliaplaats 2
2713 BJ Zoetermeer
The Netherlands

Telefon: +31 (0) 79 – 3 19 03 81
Mobile: +31 (0) 6 20618494

Email: beniers@beniers-consultancy.com
Webseite: www.beniers-consultancy.com

« Previous Page

  • Categories

  • Archiv